July 9th, 2012
ilovecharts:

The Post-College Flowchart of Misery and Pain
via shareordie

This is terrifying.

ilovecharts:

The Post-College Flowchart of Misery and Pain

via shareordie

This is terrifying.

September 28th, 2011

I have googly computer-eyes.

Though I couldn’t make it to the Academy this morning (a cumulative hour and a half on the train not worth one hour at the museum), so I’ve been at Barnes & Noble, trying to put together my Google Earth file. I met with my thesis advisers last week, and we set up a much-needed schedule to keep me on track with my progress. 

Goals:

  1. Finish GE file (with > 15 expeditions) by November 14
  2. Begin educational supplement over Thanksgiving break
  3. Finish educational supplement by the semester’s end
  4. Write introduction & methods chapters for my thesis over winter break
  5. Rough draft due March 19
  6. Final thesis due April 9

And, of course, along with these overarching goals, I have smaller things to complete (journaling about my visits to the Academy & my progress, creating an outline for the paper itself, meeting with people at the Academy to collect content for the file, etc.). 

My mind is in a tizzy, but I’m excited to finally have some structure set in place. I was hoping that the Google Earth file would be a bit more comprehensive (although I know 300+ expeditions is a little unrealistic, hello, Sara!), but everyone has their limitations, right? (Breathe, breathe, breathe! Let perfectionism and control issues go, oh my holy goodness.) I’m excited to see how this turns out… especially since I’m finally making visible progress on the GE file. Once I gather a few more pictures, I’ll be able to show some of it to you guys. Get excited!

Keep questioning,
Sara 

September 8th, 2011

infoneer-pulse:

This fall’s crop of college freshmen and their anxious parents are probably already thinking about what major to choose. After all, college is a serious financial investment, and with fears of a double-dip recession looming, picking a major that promises entree to a lucrative and sustainable career—one that allows repaying student loans—seems like a no-brainer. But is the way we’re increasingly connecting higher education with careers actually a good idea?

» via GOOD

After I read this article and filed it away in my “drafts” folder (I have 90 entries that I’ve reblogged and put in the “drafts” folder in the hopes that I’ll go back and reflect on all of them!), I had a discussion about this very topic with one of my managers at work. He expressed some regret with what he went to school for. A part of him wishes he’d gone to school for one of his more specialized interests: horticulture or culinary arts.

It seems that college used to be used to prepare society’s twenty-somethings for appropriate careers, but a lot of the students who have graduated in the past ten years are either stuck in high-paying jobs they aren’t passionate about, or working in the retail or food industries (which have, unfortunately, been deemed as “lesser” jobs by our society).

Our society is a huge web of connections that grows more complex by the second. With the increase in globalization in every aspect of our lives, jobs are breaking out of traditional molds. Sure, we still have lawyers, doctors, and financial careers, but if you’re interested in fashion, art history, and finance, there are non-profit organizations out there! If you’re interested in archaeology, biology and writing, there are news websites and organizations out there! If you’re interested in baking, math, and jewelry-making, I’m sure there is something out there to fulfill your passions! 

Instead of preparing students for run-of-the-mill careers, I view college as something different. I’ve been indulging myself in classes of all disciplines. Sure, I want to go into educational outreach in some capacity, but I’m taking a women’s studies course and cultural anthropology this semester. Why? Because I’m interested. And it can only make me more well-rounded.

As much as I am panicking about my job potential come graduation, I’m glad I’ve taken the opportunity to dabble a bit in everything I’m interested in. For me, it’s more about learning than it is career preparation.

What do you think?

Keep questioning,
Sara 

August 29th, 2011
Kumbur Village by Marcus334 via Wikimedia Commons
This semester, I’m taking my first anthropology course. I’ve always been interested in the subject, so I’m excited to finally get a taste of what cultural anthropology actually is. Growing up, I loved learning about Queen Hatshepsut through my “Where in Time is Carmen Sandiego?” computer game, Romanian culture for my 4th grade European country project, and the Middle East in 9th grade social studies class.
This semester, my class with Dr. Greene will cover cultural anthropology. We are doing four cultural “sketches” on different cultures all over the world as we read about the discipline from Cultural Anthropology: The Human Challenge. First up are the villagers of Tamil, in South India. Dr. Greene spent time studying a village in Tamil Nadu like the one pictured above. We will also be looking at the Trobriand villagers of the Pacific, the Azande of Central Africa, and the !Kung Ju/’hoansi tribe in Southern Africa.
Up until now, I have only been able to appreciate the visual beauty of global cultures — the intricate patterns woven into blankets by Navajos, the ornate jewelry and delicate saris worn by Indian women, and the beautiful photos of African tribes from National Geographic — but I haven’t committed to learning much about these varying cultures. What do the patterns mean to the Navajo people? What is the significance of weaving? The significance of the sari and women’s attire in India? I want to find more beauty in the true meaning of these symbols.
As I learn about the cultures sketched by Dr. Greene this semester, I’m hoping I will be inspired to do some of my own research. I’ve always been a people-watcher, and I’ve always been fascinated by the human psyche and the reasons for human behavior. My interests have always been on subcultures or issues in various subcultures — the role the media plays in sexism, the culture of street style photographers within the fashion blogging community, coffee shop culture in Philadelphia and the Main Line, environmental issues prevalent in our society today — and I hope to gather all of my interests to have a fuller understanding of what it means to be a human in today’s world.
Keep questioning,Sara 

Kumbur Village by Marcus334 via Wikimedia Commons

This semester, I’m taking my first anthropology course. I’ve always been interested in the subject, so I’m excited to finally get a taste of what cultural anthropology actually is. Growing up, I loved learning about Queen Hatshepsut through my “Where in Time is Carmen Sandiego?” computer game, Romanian culture for my 4th grade European country project, and the Middle East in 9th grade social studies class.

This semester, my class with Dr. Greene will cover cultural anthropology. We are doing four cultural “sketches” on different cultures all over the world as we read about the discipline from Cultural Anthropology: The Human Challenge. First up are the villagers of Tamil, in South India. Dr. Greene spent time studying a village in Tamil Nadu like the one pictured above. We will also be looking at the Trobriand villagers of the Pacific, the Azande of Central Africa, and the !Kung Ju/’hoansi tribe in Southern Africa.

Up until now, I have only been able to appreciate the visual beauty of global cultures — the intricate patterns woven into blankets by Navajos, the ornate jewelry and delicate saris worn by Indian women, and the beautiful photos of African tribes from National Geographic — but I haven’t committed to learning much about these varying cultures. What do the patterns mean to the Navajo people? What is the significance of weaving? The significance of the sari and women’s attire in India? I want to find more beauty in the true meaning of these symbols.

As I learn about the cultures sketched by Dr. Greene this semester, I’m hoping I will be inspired to do some of my own research. I’ve always been a people-watcher, and I’ve always been fascinated by the human psyche and the reasons for human behavior. My interests have always been on subcultures or issues in various subcultures — the role the media plays in sexism, the culture of street style photographers within the fashion blogging community, coffee shop culture in Philadelphia and the Main Line, environmental issues prevalent in our society today — and I hope to gather all of my interests to have a fuller understanding of what it means to be a human in today’s world.

Keep questioning,
Sara 

August 26th, 2011

darklamb:

Yeah. That’s working out really well for us.

“What the heck do I tell my daughter? […] For Women’s Equality Day, I’m telling my daughter to fight.”

Today in Women’s Studies, we went over some of the key terms for the first chunk of material we’re covering, including:

  • Feminism
  • Feminist
  • Sex vs. gender
  • Masculinity
  • Femininity
  • Androgyny
  • Oppression
  • Prejudice
  • Discrimination

We touched on so many different topics today that Professor Bowen said we’ll get to at some point during the semester… the mass media, the pop music industry, Katy Perry, socially constructed gender roles, socially acceptable “types” of gay/lesbian individuals, families who raise their children with no gender, and so much more.

I’ve already been provoked and stimulated and challenged and I’m excited to learn more about feminism. Why am I a feminist? Well, it started not too long ago, in 2008 when I started school at Penn State Brandywine. I quickly fell into a group of like-minded scholars in the first week of school. Most of them loved comic books, and though I struggled against them, insisting I would never read comics because they were lame or uninteresting, I was eventually sucked into the tantalizing world of Fables, Y: The Last Man, and Manhunter.

Until I began reading these series, Alexis was the only girl in the group who read comics. This was a role she was accustomed to playing, and was frustrated with the stereotype that only boys read comic books. This frustration led to the realization that many comics are incredibly misogynistic and sexist. Her firm stance on feminism and comic books not only led her to a research project titled “Flying in a Skirt,” but it also opened my eyes to a lot of the social, gender-based injustice there is in this world.

Led by Alexis’s convincing beliefs, the story line of Y: The Last Man, and supported by the feminist evolution of two of my favorite fashion bloggers, Tavi of Style Rookie and Arabelle of Fashion Pirate, I realized I had become a feminist, and I was proud to acknowledge myself as such.

I have become increasingly aware of the subtley sexist messages that peek through in pop music, snack food commercials, and magazine ads. I am painfully aware of the blatant sexism in a lot of other areas of media, and I have done my best to combat sexist comments when I hear them.

I just picked up A History of U.S. Feminisms by Rory C. Dicker, which I plan to read in conjunction with my Women’s Studies course. We’ll also be reading Transition by Chaz Bono and Battle Hymn of the Tiger Mother by Amy Chua. I’m ready to read up on everything that has to do with the feminist movements in our country and world today, and I’m ready to take a firm stand for what I believe in.

Keep questioning,
Sara

(Source: katespencer)

August 24th, 2011
Today marks the second day of classes, and though I walked into this semester dreading it (for several reasons… the heaviest of which is that it’s my last year of college!), I am so excited to dive deeper into these classes.
This semester I’m taking:
WMNST100: Intro to Women’s Studies
ANTHRO045: Intro to Cultural Anthropology
ASTRO001: Intro to Astronomy
I’m also helping to organize our campus’s version of TEDxPSU, which will count for 2 credits, and I’m getting credit for my work at the Academy through a 3-credit independent study. With 14 credits this semester, I’ll only need 12 more to graduate. Thank goodness the days of 19+ credit semesters are over! With all of my extra-curriculars, I need to work at a slower pace, and I’m hoping this semester will be just what the doctor ordered.
The photo for this post is of Gloria Steinem for two reasons. First, I just watched the HBO documentary, Gloria Steinem: In Her Own Words, and was captivated from beginning to end. I can’t believe it’s taken me so long to learn more about this amazing and powerful woman. Secondly, I’d like to start documenting my experiences in my WMNST100 class. Today was the first of many round table discussions, and I can already tell I’m going to have a lot to say in that class!
Professor Bowen began by taking attendance and asking each of us, one by one, “are you a feminist?” I was shocked to hear classmate after classmate say, “No.” Some expressed disgust, some indifference. I was one of two to confirm my position as a feminist, and two of my other classmates gave half-hearted, “Sorta kinda” answers to Prof. Bowen’s question.
We discussed what feminism and being a feminist means and, of course, bumped into some of the intimidating and outrageous stereotypes that have come to embody the movement. We touched on separatism, social constructs, and patriarchy. The moment in class that made me realize what I was in for this semester was when one of my peers said, “What right do women in the U.S. have to be upset when there are women in Iran who aren’t allowed to do anything?”
He had directed the question at me and I got flustered (gotta brush up on my debate skills!), but what I wish I would’ve said was, “Okay, so if I’m being hit by a family member or spouse, I have no right to complain because there are women out there who have been put in the hospital with broken bones because of a family member or spouse? Is that what you’re saying?” Because that’s what it felt like. How dare someone tell you that you don’t have the right to feel something, you know?! Don’t ever let anyone tell you how to feel.
And it’s not just in the case of white man to white female, as it was today in class. It’s in any case. It’s when a father tells his five year-old son not to cry because he has to be a “man” and ”real men” don’t cry. It’s when a young man is told not to go into teaching because that’s a woman’s job. It’s when a little girl wants to wear overalls and work boots to school and she’s made fun of because she looks like a boy. These people are told not to do or feel something they feel passionate about because they “shouldn’t.”
That is what feminism is about. It’s not just about women. It’s about equality, and I hope that my peers will be able to say, at the end of the semester, that they are feminists, too.
Keep questioning,Sara
Photo credit: "Gloria Steinem at news conference, Women’s Action Alliance, January 12, 1972" via Wikimedia Commons

Today marks the second day of classes, and though I walked into this semester dreading it (for several reasons… the heaviest of which is that it’s my last year of college!), I am so excited to dive deeper into these classes.

This semester I’m taking:

  1. WMNST100: Intro to Women’s Studies
  2. ANTHRO045: Intro to Cultural Anthropology
  3. ASTRO001: Intro to Astronomy

I’m also helping to organize our campus’s version of TEDxPSU, which will count for 2 credits, and I’m getting credit for my work at the Academy through a 3-credit independent study. With 14 credits this semester, I’ll only need 12 more to graduate. Thank goodness the days of 19+ credit semesters are over! With all of my extra-curriculars, I need to work at a slower pace, and I’m hoping this semester will be just what the doctor ordered.

The photo for this post is of Gloria Steinem for two reasons. First, I just watched the HBO documentary, Gloria Steinem: In Her Own Words, and was captivated from beginning to end. I can’t believe it’s taken me so long to learn more about this amazing and powerful woman. Secondly, I’d like to start documenting my experiences in my WMNST100 class. Today was the first of many round table discussions, and I can already tell I’m going to have a lot to say in that class!

Professor Bowen began by taking attendance and asking each of us, one by one, “are you a feminist?” I was shocked to hear classmate after classmate say, “No.” Some expressed disgust, some indifference. I was one of two to confirm my position as a feminist, and two of my other classmates gave half-hearted, “Sorta kinda” answers to Prof. Bowen’s question.

We discussed what feminism and being a feminist means and, of course, bumped into some of the intimidating and outrageous stereotypes that have come to embody the movement. We touched on separatism, social constructs, and patriarchy. The moment in class that made me realize what I was in for this semester was when one of my peers said, “What right do women in the U.S. have to be upset when there are women in Iran who aren’t allowed to do anything?”

He had directed the question at me and I got flustered (gotta brush up on my debate skills!), but what I wish I would’ve said was, “Okay, so if I’m being hit by a family member or spouse, I have no right to complain because there are women out there who have been put in the hospital with broken bones because of a family member or spouse? Is that what you’re saying?” Because that’s what it felt like. How dare someone tell you that you don’t have the right to feel something, you know?! Don’t ever let anyone tell you how to feel.

And it’s not just in the case of white man to white female, as it was today in class. It’s in any case. It’s when a father tells his five year-old son not to cry because he has to be a “man” and ”real men” don’t cry. It’s when a young man is told not to go into teaching because that’s a woman’s job. It’s when a little girl wants to wear overalls and work boots to school and she’s made fun of because she looks like a boy. These people are told not to do or feel something they feel passionate about because they “shouldn’t.”

That is what feminism is about. It’s not just about women. It’s about equality, and I hope that my peers will be able to say, at the end of the semester, that they are feminists, too.

Keep questioning,
Sara

Photo credit: "Gloria Steinem at news conference, Women’s Action Alliance, January 12, 1972" via Wikimedia Commons

August 18th, 2011
mothernaturenetwork:

A class devoted entirely to watching YouTube videos? College credit for studying Internet pornography? And how would your parents feel if you took a course on Lady Gaga’s rise to fame? It may sound outlandish, but students are taking such classes at colleges and universities across the nation.
15 bizarre college courses

Learning can happen anywhere. I fully support “bizarre” classes. They provoke students to think about everything in their daily life as a learning experience!
Keep questioning,Sara 

mothernaturenetwork:

A class devoted entirely to watching YouTube videos? College credit for studying Internet pornography? And how would your parents feel if you took a course on Lady Gaga’s rise to fame? It may sound outlandish, but students are taking such classes at colleges and universities across the nation.

15 bizarre college courses

Learning can happen anywhere. I fully support “bizarre” classes. They provoke students to think about everything in their daily life as a learning experience!

Keep questioning,
Sara 

July 23rd, 2011

#ISTE11 and Emerging #EdTech

Before I write up an entry reflecting on the past two weeks as a counselor/director for a middle school theater camp (our performances of Guys & Dolls were successful! Thanks for sending over good vibes!), I wanted to pop this video up on my blog.

Last month I attended the annual conference for ISTE, the International Society for Technology in Education. During one of my breaks between sessions, I was approached by Eric Stoller and Jen Wiggins, and they asked if I’d answer a few questions. I happily obliged and fell into a great conversation where Eric asked me about my views on technology in education — what it is, what it means to me, and where I think it’s going. (What’s funny is that I mentioned in my interview that I thought Facebook was on its way out and that something new had to be in the works and about a week later, Google+ was launched… we’ll see what happens!)

I was so excited to see Eric’s tweet this morning with a link to the final product. I was interviewed along with some of my fellow conference attendees, and their words are enlightening and inspiring to me, as a future educator. 

It’s always a bit uncomfortable for me when I attend conferences or participate in twitter’s weekly #edchats. As an undergraduate, I’m never quite sure what to hold on to… what applies to me and what doesn’t, or how I can make meaning of the brilliance that I’m lucky enough to interact with. I only hope that conferences like #ISTE11 will make more room for undergraduates and acknowledge our place in the pre-working world!

Keep questioning,
Sara 

June 27th, 2011

Update #2 from ISTE 2011

At 7:45PM my brain officially turned OFF for the night. The first day of the ISTE conference in Philadelphia was an amazing day full of motivating talks and interactions with brilliant people.

It’s funny… my experience at ISTE so far has been a real-life manifestation of today’s #edchat on twitter. In honor of ISTE, #edchat moderators hosted a special chat to discuss the topic: How are education conferences to stay relevant in a free internet-driven PD atmosphere? My knee-jerk reaction to this question turned out to be the consensus: as influential as online personal learning networks can be, face-to-face interactions are invaluable. The synergy that develops at a conference like this is something that can fuel long-lasting motivation for innovation and change in the classroom (or whatever discipline/platform it may be!).

My involvement with the community of educators on twitter (found through the weekly #edchats) has been sporadic, at best. Over the past year, I’ve spent my time on the outskirts of the community I so admire. I have, however, participated in a handful of #edchats, synthesized information from some of them here on my blog, and even tried to connect with a local teacher with whom I’d talked about the potential use of Google Earth in her classroom. Unfortunately, my involvement with the community suffered, what with my pressing school schedule, trying to balance my online identities (personal vs. academic social media accounts), my part-time jobs at a retail store and a local middle school, and my desire to find the right life-path for myself.

As I approach my senior year of college, I’m faced with the daily struggle of WHAT-DO-I-DO-WITH-MY-LIFE?! My interests spread far and wide: from the highest end of the fashion world to the musical theater stage to online communities, environmental, ethical, and social issues, and educational uses of social media and modern technology. Although my interests have a common thread, I vacillate so easily. One day I want to be a citizen journalism advocate and write on environmental and social issues, and the next day I want to be a middle school math teacher or a curriculum developer for a school district or museum.

The reason, for me, to continue education conferences is to provide meaningful connections that open new doors and windows… and help people like me see the paths less traveled. Simply watching these influential innovators mill about, exuding energy and passion for what they do is inspiring for me to watch. It’s so important for me to meet people like this at conferences like ISTE’s. The interactions I’m having give me purpose.

Keep questioning,
Sara

June 22nd, 2011
1-9-9-8:

Théodore Chassériau, The Two Sisters, 1843

Is this in the Louvre? I think I remember seeing this! 
For my Fall 2010 creative writing/trip abroad class, we had to write a poem inspired by art. Since Penn State Brandywine is such a small school, they don’t offer semesters abroad, but each semester, there are week-long trips abroad linked to classes/course credit.
My creative writing class was for the Paris trip. We went over Thanksgiving break, and it was the first time I’d ever been out of the country! (Unless you count Quebec, which was beautiful, too!) Before the trip itself, we read Julia Child’s “My Life in Paris,” and Ernest Hemingway’s “A Moveable Feast” to inspire our final assignment: writing a travel memoir.
There were also a few poetry assignments we had to complete. One of which was to craft a poem around a piece of art. When my friends and I visited the Louvre, I snapped photos of all the paintings that inspired me, and I think this was one of them! I ended up writing a poem about another piece, but I was delighted to come across this on my dashboard today!
Keep questioning,Sara 

1-9-9-8:

Théodore Chassériau, The Two Sisters, 1843

Is this in the Louvre? I think I remember seeing this! 

For my Fall 2010 creative writing/trip abroad class, we had to write a poem inspired by art. Since Penn State Brandywine is such a small school, they don’t offer semesters abroad, but each semester, there are week-long trips abroad linked to classes/course credit.

My creative writing class was for the Paris trip. We went over Thanksgiving break, and it was the first time I’d ever been out of the country! (Unless you count Quebec, which was beautiful, too!) Before the trip itself, we read Julia Child’s “My Life in Paris,” and Ernest Hemingway’s “A Moveable Feast” to inspire our final assignment: writing a travel memoir.

There were also a few poetry assignments we had to complete. One of which was to craft a poem around a piece of art. When my friends and I visited the Louvre, I snapped photos of all the paintings that inspired me, and I think this was one of them! I ended up writing a poem about another piece, but I was delighted to come across this on my dashboard today!

Keep questioning,
Sara 

(via levi-athan)

June 12th, 2011

psubrandywine: “Students share how scholarships have helped them succeed and grow at Penn State Brandywine. This video was created by alumnus Justin Carrington.”

I totally forgot about this! The final product is really great :)

Keep questioning,
Sara 

April 18th, 2011

divinityphotography:

  • Yale offers a number of classes, via recorded lectures and downloadable paperwork, in a number of areas. They’re free and available to anyone with internet access. Go check them out!

kicksandgiggles:

positivelypersistentteach:

  • I would totally do one with you.  Wouldn’t it be cool if we got several Tumblrs (doesn’t have to be teachers) to ALL DO IT AT THE SAME TIME!? Who is interested? I’m full of ideas today!

YES! It’s like a book club but with SCHOOL.

How can we get this off the ground?! I’m so in!

Keep questioning,
Sara

(via positivelypersistentteach)

April 2nd, 2011

ATTENTION UNDERGRADUATES: FIND A MENTOR!

A little self-disclosure: it’s been a rough semester.

As much as I’m enjoying my classes (particularly the Water: Science & Society and comparative religion courses), it’s been tough managing my time and my priorities, with various jobs, classes, school work, and thesis prep… and as a result, my emotions about being so busy/overwhelmed/CRAZY-STRESSED!

I know this happens to everyone at some point, whether it’s in college or not: what am I doing with my life? I need to soak everything up and do everything I can! I need to do my absolute best or else I’m going to disappoint not only myself, but others, too!

It’s tough going through these existential crises, especially if you think you’re alone. Communicating with my adviser has been paramount in getting through these tough times. Even though periods of discontent and frustration come in waves (and unfortunately affect my progress in school), it’s my determination that taps me on the shoulder every once in a while and says gently, “Hey Sar, you need a little extra help! You can do better than this!”

It’s these times when I’ve turned to my adviser and mentor for a little extra push. Not only that, but understanding too. A little aside: One of the students in our honors’ program is what we call an “adult learner.” She has a family of her own: two sons (who I believe have finished college?), and a daughter currently studying abroad in New Zealand. This is the first semester I’ve had classes with her. One morning, before diving into the deep meaning of cosmology and cosmetics (a story for another day!), she turned to me and said, “Sara, I don’t know how you all do this! I’m taking 15 credits and I can’t ever do this much again! It’s so much work… and you all manage jobs and social life, too? I can’t imagine!”

It’s true: college students are the ULTIMATE multi-taskers (albeit the ultimate procrastinators, too). Not only are we all juggling school, work, family and social life, but we’re going through an intense shift in power: we are now in control of our lives. As liberating as it is, it’s scary, too! And this is why college can be so hard if you don’t have someone to talk to, someone who understands what you, specifically, are going through. They can help tailor your college experience to fit your needs, your strengths, and your dreams!

So… this is a long-winded way of saying: GO FIND A FRIEND IN A FACULTY MEMBER. Find someone you trust, someone who is easy to talk to, someone you respect. Ideally, the trust and respect will be mutual, and can only help foster an amazing undergraduate learning experience.

Keep questioning,
Sara

March 29th, 2011

Scheduling classes for next semester…

I need to pick two of the following:

  • WMNST001: Introduction to Women’s Studies
  • PHIL008: Philosophy & Feminism
  • ANTH045: Cultural Anthropology
  • PSYCH221: Intro to Social Psychology

I absolutely want to take PHIL008, but I’m already in class 3.5 hours straight right before that one… and I’ve never taken a night class. Not sure how my attention span will fare.

Suggestions?

March 11th, 2011
laughingsquid:

Treasure Island Can Scuplture

Part of the honors program’s mission on campus is civic engagement. In addition to my courses this semester, I’m taking a 1-credit option based on Philabundance’s annual Canstruction competition! In the fall, we decided to draft a sculpture of our own and submit an application for the competition. We’ve made it past the first round and will be can-structing our very own structure during the overnight build session in May.
All of the sculptures must be made purely of canned foods (like the image above), and after the pieces are judged all of the food goes to Philabundance! What a fun way to donate time and energy to a great cause. Can’t wait to get started!
Keep questioning,Sara 

laughingsquid:

Treasure Island Can Scuplture

Part of the honors program’s mission on campus is civic engagement. In addition to my courses this semester, I’m taking a 1-credit option based on Philabundance’s annual Canstruction competition! In the fall, we decided to draft a sculpture of our own and submit an application for the competition. We’ve made it past the first round and will be can-structing our very own structure during the overnight build session in May.

All of the sculptures must be made purely of canned foods (like the image above), and after the pieces are judged all of the food goes to Philabundance! What a fun way to donate time and energy to a great cause. Can’t wait to get started!

Keep questioning,
Sara