January 19th, 2012
HovsgolNuurHadag.jpg by Yaan, via Wikimedia Commons
A little snapshot of Lake Hovsgol in Mongolia - a research site for aquatic ecologist, Clyde Goulden, from the Academy of Natural Sciences.
Keep questioning!Sara 

HovsgolNuurHadag.jpg by Yaan, via Wikimedia Commons

A little snapshot of Lake Hovsgol in Mongolia - a research site for aquatic ecologist, Clyde Goulden, from the Academy of Natural Sciences.

Keep questioning!
Sara 

November 5th, 2011
 Capacity Building at Hovsgol, ANSP’s 200 Stories
Mongolian researchers and students discuss steppe ecology at the Hovsgol Long-Term Ecological Reseach Site in Mongolia. 
In 1997 Mongolia’s government established a network of Long-Term Ecological Research Sites (LTERS) to address its concerns about environmental protection, sustainable economic development, and climate change. Already the subject of considerable study by the Academy’s Dr. Clyde Goulden and colleagues, Hovsgol National Park became the first site in this network and one of the first Asian LTERS in an international network of similar research sites. Research at Hovsgol includes surveying insects, monitoring forest regeneration, and assessing climate change impacts including the dynamics of thaw of permafrost.
Programs at Hovsgol also are geared toward the training and professional development of Mongolian scientists. Ariuntsetseg Lkhagva is a striking example of a Mongolian scientist who prospered after she began work at Hovsgol in 2002. She has received an International Fulbright Science and Technology Award and is pursuing a doctorate in botany at the University of Wyoming. Her research in rangeland ecology may help us understand how pastures respond to overgrazing and the alteration of rainfall patterns associated with climate change.
Learn more about research at Hovsgol at ansp.org!

 Capacity Building at Hovsgol, ANSP’s 200 Stories

Mongolian researchers and students discuss steppe ecology at the Hovsgol Long-Term Ecological Reseach Site in Mongolia.

In 1997 Mongolia’s government established a network of Long-Term Ecological Research Sites (LTERS) to address its concerns about environmental protection, sustainable economic development, and climate change. Already the subject of considerable study by the Academy’s Dr. Clyde Goulden and colleagues, Hovsgol National Park became the first site in this network and one of the first Asian LTERS in an international network of similar research sites. Research at Hovsgol includes surveying insects, monitoring forest regeneration, and assessing climate change impacts including the dynamics of thaw of permafrost.

Programs at Hovsgol also are geared toward the training and professional development of Mongolian scientists. Ariuntsetseg Lkhagva is a striking example of a Mongolian scientist who prospered after she began work at Hovsgol in 2002. She has received an International Fulbright Science and Technology Award and is pursuing a doctorate in botany at the University of Wyoming. Her research in rangeland ecology may help us understand how pastures respond to overgrazing and the alteration of rainfall patterns associated with climate change.

Learn more about research at Hovsgol at ansp.org!

October 5th, 2011
Lake Hovsgol, Mongolia
ANSP’s 200 Stories
“When he first set eyes on Lake Hovsgol during the summer of 1994, Clyde Goulden knew it was special. Also known as Hövsgöl Nuur, Lake Hovsgol is located near Mongolia’s northern border with Russia. It’s nearly 85 miles long, more than 800 feet deep, and among the oldest lakes in the world. It’s also remarkably pristine. One could drink freely from its waters and see fish swimming 30 feet below its surface. Locals refer to it as the ‘blue pearl.’”
To read the rest of this story, click here.
Keep questioning,Sara 

Lake Hovsgol, Mongolia

ANSP’s 200 Stories

When he first set eyes on Lake Hovsgol during the summer of 1994, Clyde Goulden knew it was special. Also known as Hövsgöl Nuur, Lake Hovsgol is located near Mongolia’s northern border with Russia. It’s nearly 85 miles long, more than 800 feet deep, and among the oldest lakes in the world. It’s also remarkably pristine. One could drink freely from its waters and see fish swimming 30 feet below its surface. Locals refer to it as the ‘blue pearl.’”

To read the rest of this story, click here.

Keep questioning,
Sara