January 1st, 2014
October 29th, 2011
A little more from the PA Women’s Conference:
After the opening keynotes, I attended a talk given by Betsy Myers titled, “Take the Lead: Motivate, Inspire, and Bring Out the Best in Yourself and Everyone Around You.” Myers, known for her work with the Clinton and Obama administrations, founded the Center for Women and Business at Bentley University and has just published a book under the same title as her talk at the conference.
Myers illustrated the components of being an effective leader in the workplace. The number one reason why people are not happy in the workplace is because of their relationship with their immediate boss. Myers wondered what was going wrong. How was it that some leaders commanded respect and still got work done, while others were hated? She shared with us the three key beliefs of leadership:
Be rigorous in your pursuit of knowledge. Honest self-reflection and reliable “truth tellers” in your life will help you learn.
Be willing to ask the questions. Leaders can’t have all the answers.
Leaders bring out the productive feeling in themselves and their people. We are human beings first, and our feelings determine our motivation, engagement, and how we connect. When people feel valued, supported, appreciated, and understood, they do their best work.
Other components of success as a leader include the following principles: authenticity, connection, respect, learning, clarity, connection, and most of all, courage. She left us with the idea that these principles are the “road map to getting yourself to feel the feelings and those around you. Leadership is messy. There’s no exact way to do it… that’s what kinda makes it fun. Get in there and enjoy the process. Sometimes if we skin our knees, that’s okay. That’s how we learn.”
Though I wasn’t sure if I would get much out of this talk (initially, I thought it would be too career/in-the-office-focused), I was pleasantly surprised by how applicable these principles are to everyday life. I would consider myself a leader in my Women’s Studies class, by being brave enough to be authentic, speaking up for what I believe in. I’m a leader in my role as Assistant Director for Great Valley Middle School’s annual musicals, not only to the children I teach, but hopefully to my colleagues as well. I’m a leader at my part-time retail job, connecting with others, making sure to ask questions, taking initiative, being real. It was a valuable session to sit in on, and I’m so grateful I had the chance to hear the charismatic and intelligent Ms. Myers speak.
Keep questioning,Sara 
P.S. Excuse the horrible iPhone picture… it’s only one I have of Betsy!

A little more from the PA Women’s Conference:

After the opening keynotes, I attended a talk given by Betsy Myers titled, “Take the Lead: Motivate, Inspire, and Bring Out the Best in Yourself and Everyone Around You.” Myers, known for her work with the Clinton and Obama administrations, founded the Center for Women and Business at Bentley University and has just published a book under the same title as her talk at the conference.

Myers illustrated the components of being an effective leader in the workplace. The number one reason why people are not happy in the workplace is because of their relationship with their immediate boss. Myers wondered what was going wrong. How was it that some leaders commanded respect and still got work done, while others were hated? She shared with us the three key beliefs of leadership:

  1. Be rigorous in your pursuit of knowledge. Honest self-reflection and reliable “truth tellers” in your life will help you learn.
  2. Be willing to ask the questions. Leaders can’t have all the answers.
  3. Leaders bring out the productive feeling in themselves and their people. We are human beings first, and our feelings determine our motivation, engagement, and how we connect. When people feel valued, supported, appreciated, and understood, they do their best work.

Other components of success as a leader include the following principles: authenticity, connection, respect, learning, clarity, connection, and most of all, courage. She left us with the idea that these principles are the “road map to getting yourself to feel the feelings and those around you. Leadership is messy. There’s no exact way to do it… that’s what kinda makes it fun. Get in there and enjoy the process. Sometimes if we skin our knees, that’s okay. That’s how we learn.”

Though I wasn’t sure if I would get much out of this talk (initially, I thought it would be too career/in-the-office-focused), I was pleasantly surprised by how applicable these principles are to everyday life. I would consider myself a leader in my Women’s Studies class, by being brave enough to be authentic, speaking up for what I believe in. I’m a leader in my role as Assistant Director for Great Valley Middle School’s annual musicals, not only to the children I teach, but hopefully to my colleagues as well. I’m a leader at my part-time retail job, connecting with others, making sure to ask questions, taking initiative, being real. It was a valuable session to sit in on, and I’m so grateful I had the chance to hear the charismatic and intelligent Ms. Myers speak.

Keep questioning,
Sara 

P.S. Excuse the horrible iPhone picture… it’s only one I have of Betsy!

October 15th, 2011

10 days until the PA Conference for Women!

Last month I received an email invitation from our chancellor, asking if I would like to attend the PA Conference for Women in Philadelphia on October 25th. At first I was hesitant. Over the past two years, I’ve kind of had my share of the conference circuit, and didn’t want to commit. However, my recent obsession with interest in women’s studies nudged me to take a peek at the conference’s website to see what it was all about. This is what I found…

"YES PLEASE OMG" I responded quickly (well, in a matter of speaking), hoping my three-day-long hesitation didn’t barricade me from this once-in-a-lifetime offering. Gloria Steinem? THE Gloria Steinem? After watching the recent HBO documentary on Steinem, I have been hungry for more information about her, the women’s liberation movement in the 70s, and feminism in general. I bought A History of U.S. Feminisms by Rory C. Dicker and I’ve been scouring the internet for feminist media sources and blogs (feministing, xoJane, Rookie, Feministe, Tiger Beatdown, the Ms. Magazine blog, and gURL.com, to name a few) and honing my radar in on relevant news articles.

I am insanely excited to be a part of a gathering of intelligent and driven women. Thanks to the conference, I will not only get to devour advice and wisdom from Gloria Steinem, America Ferrera, Gretchen Rubin, Marion Jones, and many more, but I will get to be in the presence of young women who are just like me — seeking guidance, empowerment, and encouragement on the paths that are our lives. I will get to listen to the inspiring stories from women like my school’s chancellor, women who have started their own businesses, psychologists, authors, politicians, fashion designers, bloggers, and students like me.

I am currently struggling with the idea of what will happen after graduation. Though I know that no decision I make has to be absolute, I really just want to put a lot of thought into what’s best for me. What do I really want to do? Where do I want to live? What are my priorities and values when it comes to choosing a career path? I’m hoping that this conference will give me motivation to think more about my options, rather than hiding from them (like I’ve been doing for the past few months).

I know I’m young. I know I can choose my own path at any stage in my life. I know I have hundreds of options. I’m hoping these women can give me a little nudge in the direction that is best for me right now. AND OMG GLORIA STEINEM.

Keep questioning,
Sara 

June 2nd, 2011
Wahoo, women in science!!!
Keep questioning,Sara 

Wahoo, women in science!!!

Keep questioning,
Sara 

(Source: freshphotons, via poptech)

May 25th, 2011
doctorswithoutborders:

Pakistan has one of the highest rates of maternal and infant mortality in Central Asia. It is a particular problem in embattled Khyber Pakhtunkhwa Province, where access to medical care of any kind is limited and insecurity makes it even harder to reach treatment when needed.
As so often happens, the toll of a situation like this falls heavily on women and children. After evaluating obstetric and gynecological needs in and around Khyber Pakhtunkhwa’s main city, Peshawar, MSF decided to build a 30-bed reference hospital that is dedicated solely to women and is furnished with a labor and delivery room and an operating room.
Photo: Pakistan 2010 © Ton Koene

I’m passionate about raising awareness of global issues. I know that not everyone can commit to saving the world, but if each of us targets an issue we’re passionate about, and we work with others to make good, we can ultimately create a better world.
Keep questioning,Sara 

doctorswithoutborders:

Pakistan has one of the highest rates of maternal and infant mortality in Central Asia. It is a particular problem in embattled Khyber Pakhtunkhwa Province, where access to medical care of any kind is limited and insecurity makes it even harder to reach treatment when needed.

As so often happens, the toll of a situation like this falls heavily on women and children. After evaluating obstetric and gynecological needs in and around Khyber Pakhtunkhwa’s main city, Peshawar, MSF decided to build a 30-bed reference hospital that is dedicated solely to women and is furnished with a labor and delivery room and an operating room.

Photo: Pakistan 2010 © Ton Koene

I’m passionate about raising awareness of global issues. I know that not everyone can commit to saving the world, but if each of us targets an issue we’re passionate about, and we work with others to make good, we can ultimately create a better world.

Keep questioning,
Sara 

(via doctorswithoutborders)